Aims of Mathematics

The aims of all MYP subjects state what a teacher may expect to teach and what a student may expect to experience and learn. These aims suggest how the student may be changed by the learning experience.
The aims of MYP mathematics are to encourage and enable students to:

  • enjoy mathematics, develop curiosity and begin to appreciate its elegance and power
  • develop an understanding of the principles and nature of mathematics
  • communicate clearly and confidently in a variety of contexts
  • develop logical, critical and creative thinking
  • develop confidence, perseverance, and independence in mathematical thinking and problem-solving
  • develop powers of generalization and abstraction
  • apply and transfer skills to a wide range of real-life situations, other areas of knowledge and future developments
  • appreciate how developments in technology and mathematics have influenced each other
  • appreciate the moral, social and ethical implications arising from the work of mathematicians and the applications of mathematics
  • appreciate the international dimension in mathematics through an awareness of the universality of mathematics and its multicultural and historical perspectives
  • appreciate the contribution of mathematics to other areas of knowledge
  • develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to pursue further studies in mathematics
  • develop the ability to reflect critically upon their own work and the work of others.

From Mathematics Subject Guide




Mathematics plays an essential role both within the school and in society. It promotes a powerful universal language, analytical reasoning and problem-solving skills that contribute to the development of logical, abstract and critical thinking. Moreover, understanding and being able to use mathematics with confidence is not only an advantage in school but also a skill for problem-solving and decision-making in everyday life. Therefore, mathematics should be accessible to and studied by all students. Mathematics is well known as a foundation for the study of sciences, engineering and technology. However, it is also increasingly important in other areas of knowledge such as economics and other social sciences. MYP mathematics aims to equip all students with the knowledge, understanding and intellectual capabilities to address further courses in mathematics, as well as to prepare those students who will use mathematics in their workplace and life in general.
Adapted From Mathematics Subject Guide





Grade 6, Year 1

Unit Title: Number Sense
Key Concept: Relationships
Related Concept: Patterns and Systems
Global Context: Fairness and Development (Inequality, inclusion, and civic responsibility in the public sphere)


Statement of Inquiry: Social relationships can be analysed to classify systemic inequalities and predict patterns of oppression in the public sphere.


Overview: Students will be studying two different Chicago neighborhoods to learn about systemic inequalities that can be represented using math. We will be exploring information about homelessness populations, unemployment, neighborhood schools, and access to grocery stores. Students will compile their data in the form of an oral presentation modeled after the NPR program, This American Life. Students will create a short (5-10 minute) radio broadcast sharing their findings and their conclusions.


GRASPS Task
Background Information:

Chicago Public Schools is one of the largest districts in the country. Students in CPS go to a variety of different schools in their neighborhoods and across the city. Each year, students take standardized tests. The district uses this data, along with other information, to figure out which schools are doing well and which schools are struggling. This data can tell us a lot about the schools. A lot of research has been done to find out whether students’ lives are impacted by the types of schools they attend.

Additionally, Chicago is a city of neighborhoods. These neighborhoods are often segregated by race and class (how much money a family makes.) This can have an impact on the test scores of schools in those neighborhoods.





Your GRASP: Creating a public radio broadcast about segregation in Chicago Public Schools

Goal: Your goal is to create a four- to ten-minute oral presentation about segregation in Chicago and its public schools. You will write out your oral presentation, and if possible, you will record it using a podcasting app.

Role: You are an investigating journalist looking at segregation in Chicago and Chicago Public Schools. You are investigating three different schools: Agassiz, Barry, and South Shore, to determine whether segregation exists in Chicago and CPS, and whether it has an effect on students. You’re putting together a podcast to share your findings with other people who might not know about this problem, including school staff.

Audience: Your audience includes your classmates, your principal, your family, and any other adult or student who might be interested in segregation in Chicago. You will need to make sure that your presentation explains enough detail so that someone who has NOT studied this can understand the problem.

  • Some of the people who are hearing your presentation might be able to help you address this problem! Be sure to include some ideas about ways to solve school segregation.

Situation: In Chicago, different neighborhoods are often segregated by race and class. Your radio program is addressing the ways this affects kids who go to Chicago Public Schools. By looking at three different neighborhoods (Lakeview, South Shore, and Hermosa), and three different public schools (Agassiz, Barry, and South Shore Fine Arts) you will come to an understanding of how a Chicago student’s location and race impacts his or her school and daily life. You will use your radio program to share your understanding with your audience. Your radio program may include some ideas about ways that we can work to improve this situation.

Product/Performance/Purpose: You are to create a script for an oral presentation. Your script should include the following information and follow these guidelines:

  • Your script should be typed
  • Your script, when read out loud, should last between 4 and 10 minutes
  • Include numerical and categorical data about Chicago’s racial makeup
  • Written discussion or explanation about Chicago’s racial makeup and how it might affect a student’s life outside of school
  • Include background information about each of the three schools we are studying
  • Include numerical data from various sources about each school’s standardized test performance (ISAT and NWEA math and reading growth)
  • Include numerical data about each school’s student body
  • Include categorical and numerical data from the My Voice, My School survey for each school
  • Explain what conclusions you can draw about each school, and the students there, based on the data
  • Explain the phrase “The Problem We All Live With”-- what does it mean to you? Do we live with it today?
  • Share some ideas that you have about how individuals or schools can help fix this problem

Here are the things you need to turn in:

  1. Your script, typed
  2. Any charts, graphs, or data tables you have created during this project (in class, we will put these on posters to hang in the hallway so that we can share our data)




GRASPS Rubric in Student-Friendly Language
Score
The "Podcast" part
Score
The "Math" part
0
Work is off-topic, incomplete, or unacceptable.
0
Work is off-topic, incomplete, or unacceptable.
1-2
You can:
  • Use basic mathematical words and terms
  • Use basic forms of math to present your work
But:
  • Your information is confusing or hard to understand
1-2
You can:
  • Identify some effects of segregation on students
  • Use graphs and data to reach a very basic conclusion about segregation in Chicago schools
But you don’t:
  • Provide any new or insightful information other than what was given in class.
3-4
You can:
  • Use some correct mathematical words and terms
  • Use different types of math (data, percentages, etc.) to present information correctly
  • Communicate in a way that an audience can mostly understand
  • Mostly organize information in a way that makes sense
3-4
You can:
  • Identify the important pieces of Chicago school segregation: race, test scores, culture and climate
  • Use graphs and data to reach a conclusion about Chicago school segregation, with help from the teacher.
  • Say whether some Chicago schools are segregated, and what this means for kids in those schools
5-6
You can:
  • Usually use the correct mathematical words and terms
  • Usually use different types of math to present information correctly (percentages, data, etc.)
  • Communicate the presentation in a way that is clear
  • Present work that is usually organized
5-6
You can:
  • Identify the relevant elements of segregation in Chicago schools: race, test scores, culture and climate
  • Select good mathematical tools and words to explain segregation in Chicago schools
  • Describe how accurate your findings are
  • State correctly whether your findings makes sense, and what they mean for kids in different schools
7-8
You can:
  • Almost always use correct mathematical language
  • Almost always use different types of math to present information correctly
  • Communicate all your thinking clearly
  • Create work that is almost always organized and logical
7-8
You can:
  • Identify the important elements of segregation in Chicago schools: race, test scores, culture and climate, gentrification
  • Choose mathematical words and tools to show what segregation looks like in Chicago neighborhoods and schools
  • Explain why your findings are true and accurate
  • Apply what you have learned to come up with a solution to segregation in CPS
  • Explain whether your solution will work, or what might stop it from working


Grade 7, Year 2

Unit Title: Shapes and Design-Two Dimensional Geometry
Key Concept: Form
Related Concept: Model and Pattern
Global Context: Adaption, Ingenuity and Progress

Statement of Inquiry: Certain polygons often form naturally in our world and when architects design new structures.

Overview:
Students will be studying characteristics of polygons. Students will explore properties of polygons (such as when can a triangle be created if given 3 side lengths) using hands-on exploitative activities. Students will also examine which types of polygons are found naturally in the world and which are used in man-made structures. As a final project, students will compile pictures of polygons found in magazines or though pictures taken and printed out. They will then write a short argumentative paper on which polygon they feel has the most importance to this world and why.




END OF THE UNIT GRASP TASK YEAR 2


Goal: Find Polygons in Natural and Man-Made Spaces
Role: Photographer / Engineer
Audience: Other students / colleagues
Situation: You are an engineering student studying the types of polygons that are formed in nature and the types of polygons engineers use when designing buildings.
Performance: You are will be taking pictures (or finding them in magazines) of polygons found in nature and of man-made polygons (In construction and architecture). After pasting these pictures on a poster board and highlighting the polygons found, you will then write a summary of the types of polygons you typically see in nature vs the polygons found. (You may use the picture at the bottom of this page as an example of how your polygons should be highlighted on your pictures).
Your summery should include-
What polygons were more common in manmade structures?
Which polygons were more common in nature?
What reasons can you think of that would cause some polygons to be more prevalent in manmade objects compared to natural objects?
In your opinion, what is the most important polygon to mankind? WHY?



Criterion C: Communicating
Achievement Level
Level Descriptor
Level Descriptor
0
The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below.
The student does not reach a standard described by any of the descriptors below.
1-2
The student is able to:

-use limited mathematical language

-use limited forms of mathematical representation to present information

-communicate through lines of reasoning that are difficult to understand
The student is able to:

-use limited language relating to polygons

-use limited forms of mathematical representation to present case of mose important polygon
-communicate, through use of pictures and verbal explanation, the most important polygon to man
3-4
The student is able to:

-use some appropriate mathematical language

-use different forms of mathematical representation to present information adequately

-communicate through lines of reasoning that are able to be understood, although these are not always coherent

-adequately organize information using a logical structure
The student is able to:

-use some appropriate language relating to polygons

-use different forms of mathematical representation to present case of mose important polygon

-communicate through lines of reasoning that are able to be understood, although these are not always coherent the most important polygon to man

-adequately organize information that presents case of the most importnat polygon using a logical structure
5-6
The student is able to:

-usually use appropriate mathematical language

-usually use different forms of mathematical representation to present information correctly

-communicate through lines of reasoning that are usually coherent

-present work that is usually organized using a logical structure
The student is able to:

-usually use appropriate mathematical language relating to polygons

-usually use mathematical representation to present case of mose important polygon

-communicate the most important polygon to man

-present work, that is usually organized information, that presents case of the most importnat polygon using a logical structure
7-8
The student is able to:

-consistently use appropriate mathematical language

-consistently use different forms of mathematical representation to present information correctly

-communicate clearly through coherent lines of reasoning

-present work that is consistently organized using a logical structure
The student is able to:

-consistently use appropriate mathematical language relating to polygons

-consistently use mathematical representations to present case of the most important polygon

-communicate clearly through coherent lines of reasoning the most important polygon to man

-present work, that is consistently organized, that presents the case of the most importnat polygon using a logical structure





Grade 7, Year 2
Quarter 2


Key Concept: Relationships
Related Concepts: Equivalence and Quantity
Global Context: Globalization and sustainability

SOI:Identifying equivalence and quantity defines relationships in the real world.


Overview: : Students will be learning how to multiply, divide, add, and subtract rational numbers. Students will then learn how to balance equations by solving for x and graph linear equations. As a final task students will balance a budget as if they were a recent college graduate.